Research Projects

Supervisor(s): 

Maria Cunningham

My Research Interests are: 

  • Molecular Astrophysics: One of my main areas of research is the use of molecular line radiation to investigate the physical conditions and chemistry of molecular clo

Supervisor(s): 

Steven Sherwood
Multiple projects are available to work with Prof. Steven Sherwood or other academics at the Climate Change Research Centre

Supervisor(s): 

Jeremy Bailey

My research group studies the atmospheres of stars, exoplanets, and Solar-system planets using a combination of advanced instrument development, observing programs on large telescopes, and state-of-the-art modelling tools.

Supervisor(s): 

Michael Ashley

Michael's research interests centre around astronomy from Antarctica. This includes the design and construction of instrumentation for use in Antarctica, and in the analysis of data collected by the instruments.

Supervisor(s): 

Maria Cunningham

How life formed on Planet Earth is one of the big questions that we want to answer as scientists.

Supervisor(s): 

Maria Cunningham


The formation and evolution of stars drives the evolution of galaxies in the universe at all epochs (times), from the earliest observable galaxies to our own Milky Way.

Supervisor(s): 

Dennis Stello
NASA's Kepler mission has provided a legacy data set for the study of stars and their planets. Kepler's high precision measurements reveals stellar brightness variations caused by oscillations of standing sound waves inside the stars. Just like the sound of a violin and a bass are different due to their different size, the Stellar Oscillations Group led by Dennis Stello uses observed frequencies of stellar oscillations to determine the sizes and masses of stars and what they are made of. Using this technique -- called asteroseismology -- is currently revolutionizing stellar astrophysics.

Supervisor(s): 

Sarah Brough

Galaxies in our local Universe are quite different from the galaxies we see at cosmological distances (which is also a long time ago). I study nearby galaxies in great detail to understand the physical mechanisms that cause them to evolve.

Supervisor(s): 

Sarah Martell

Galactic archaeology: Galactic archaeology is the study of the Milky Way's structure and evolution, based on detailed information about the orbits and chemical compositions of the stars in it.

Supervisor(s): 

Chris Tinney
Prof. Tinney undertakes research in the search for, and study of, exoplanets (planets orbiting other stars) and brown dwarfs (failed stars that share many properties with exoplanets). In support of these research programs he is a leader of the FunnelWeb spectroscopic survey of the southern sky, and head of the Veloce planet search facility at the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). He uses telescopes in Australia (AAT) and Chile (6.5m Magellan and 8m ESO Very Large Telescope), as well as data from NASA's TESS planet search mission. The project information below is a snapshot of current activities - students interested in this science are encouraged to come and talk further with him for more details, and other projects in this area.